Holiday invites to interested choir members

Concert tickets:

Aliqua is having a full length holiday show at the Vogue on Sunday, Dec 12th, at 7:30pm and OiH members are eligible for a special rate on tickets. Instead of $35, any member of a choir can get tickets for $25 each.

For more info: info@aliqua.com or call 604 809 3746 (Contact them soon… this is a limited time offer!)

The choir also has a link with some free song downloads:

https://rcpt.yousendit.com/999566571/7a5cefe3d2d6637a9c5410f0f0d8bdab

Carolling for a Cause:
F*ck Cancer invites singers to the Art Gallery for some carolling on December 16th; they’ve written some “revamped” carols that are all about early detection. They say:

It should be a really fun event, and we’d absolutely love “Out in Harmony” to be a part of it! We’re planning on having some media, bloggers, influencers etc in attendance to capture the moment, and it would be fantastic to have you…

Let me know if you’d like a sample of some of our song lyrics, but basically we’re just going to rally together for an hour or two and belt out some acapella christmas carols with “early detection” lyrics. We’re excited to hit the streets and hopefully inspire a few people to stay on top of their regular cancer screenings : ) You can check out our Facebook invite (sample lyrics are at the bottom of the thread!)

Member profile: Meet Myriam!

This is Myriam’s first year in a choir since high school and she is very excited to be singing with Out in Harmony! Myriam teaches grade 4/5 at Hastings Elementary Community School. She is also a member of PEN (Pride Education Network), which advocates for an inclusive, respectful environment for all students, staff and families, regardless of their actual or perceived sexual orientation and/or gender identity, within all B.C. educational institutions, through the development of concrete supports, policies, resources and actions. She also travels around the province and gives workshops for teachers on anti-transphobia/homophobia education.

myriam

During her spare time she likes being outside, gardening or walking her friend Tuk. She also enjoys discovering new vegetarian dishes, reading a good book and knitting. Myriam plays the piano and music has always played a big role in her life. She is thrilled to have found a choir as wonderful as Out in Harmony!

Member profile: Meet Lauryn!

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Lauryn began singing like an angel when she was just a toddler. Growing up on the East Coast, where music was an important part of daily life, she was frequently in demand with requests to do renditions of “The Bluenose Sails Once Again.” Later, she joined choirs in school and church, and carried over her love of singing to her migration to Toronto, where she was a member of Singing Out! and a women’s choir.

Upon moving to the West Coast, Lauryn promptly joined the VLGC, now Out in Harmony, and sings her heart out at practices and concerts. Lauryn works in communications and fundraising and has brought soome of those skills to her position as a new OIH Board member.

FAQs

Here are answers to some of the questions we’ve been asked.  Don’t see the answer here?  Ask away!

When and where do you rehearse?

Every Tuesday from September to mid-June, 7:30 – 9:30 at St. Margaret’s Cedar Cottage Anglican Church, 1530 E. 22nd Avenue (at Dumfries, near the corner of Kingsway and Knight), Vancouver.  We usually have a weekend retreat once per term.

Do I have to be gay to sing with you?

We welcome people of all genders, orientations, and levels of ability who want to sing together in community.

Is there an audition?

No! You will never be asked to sing alone, unless you decide you want to try a solo. (Though if you would like some advice on which part to sing, the director would be happy to spend a few minutes with you at the piano.)

Do I have to be able to read music?

No! We have a number of members who sing with us very successfully who don’t read music at all.

Do you use rehearsal tapes?

Not at this time. If this is a tool that works for you, you’re welcome to record rehearsals and practice with that.

Do I have to memorize the music?

It makes for a better concert experience if you have your music memorized, so we encourage you to try, but you can use music during concerts if you need it.

Do you only accept new members in September?

No, feel free to drop by any time! We have our major concerts in January and June. If you join right before a concert, you and the director will decide together whether you’re ready to perform, but you’re still welcome to come on Tuesdays and sing!

What if I need to miss a rehearsal?

We understand that we all have lives outside of choir, and sometimes that means missing a rehearsal.  If you aren’t going to be there on a Tuesday, or for some other scheduled choir event, we ask that you let your section leader know.   If you need to miss several rehearsals, we’d still like to have you come on Tuesdays and sing with us, and you and the director can decide together whether you’ll be ready to sing in the concert.

What if I need to miss an outreach performance or retreat?

When we are scheduling something for a time other than a Tuesday, we ask the choir as far in advance as possible to make sure that we’ll have enough singers to participate.

What kind of music do you sing?

A variety. We sing pop/rock, vocal jazz, madrigals or light classical pieces, selections from musicals, folk songs, and music that defies categorization. We mostly sing in English, but we have been known to sing in Italian, Spanish, and Russian, to name a few.

Do you sing religious music?

Generally, no. Very occasionally we’ll sing something with the word “god” in it, but it’s usually music that leaves the definition up to the singers and audience.

Can I bring my child/pet to rehearsals?

Regretfully, no. Choir is a group of adults who get together for just two hours a week, and the focus is on singing. We’d be happy to meet your child/pet at a choir social event, but they can cause too much distraction at rehearsals. (Assistance animals are, of course, welcome.)

Does it cost money to join the choir?

We don’t want finances to be a barrier to anyone’s involvement. Everyone pays $5 per year to become a member of the Society. There is a $15 one-time music fee when you first join the choir. (If paying that all at once is a problem, talk to our Treasurer.) The amount you pay on top of that is up to you. The suggested monthly donation is $30, but some people pay less, and some pay more.

Are you a registered charity?

Yes, we are both a non-profit society and a registered charity. Donations can be made through our website, and tax receipts will be issued for all amounts over $20.

How often do you perform?

We have two major concerts a year, usually late January and mid-June.  We also sing at smaller outreach performances every month or two.  We’ve sung at community centres, seniors’ homes, hospitals, fundraisers, and church services, to name a few.  Some years we make an out-of-town trip – the most recent have included Saltspring Island and Sechelt.

Will you come and sing for my group/event?

We do a number of smaller appearances throughout the season, both paid and volunteer. If you’d like to invite us to sing, please contact outinharmony@gmail.com.

Manly Basses

The first time I switched to bass, it was both exciting and uncertain. Exciting because I get to sing differently, and uncertain because I had no idea what I was doing. Being a real trouper, I lingered on, hoping that I didn’t make a bad decision.

One of the songs we did, Vladimir Radian’s version of The Maple Leaf Forever, was for the Vancouver Unison in 2006. The bass part was really low, so I decided to come back up to baritone (or tenor 2). When we sang it at the Chan Centre at UBC, the gorgeous acoustics of the performance hall magnified the opening bass notes into a lovely low rumble that made my spine tingle. I’ve never heard anything so beautiful.

Over the years I’ve gotten so used to singing the low parts that I can project the bass notes. It felt like I’ve grown a lot of hair on my chest though, or as if my Adam’s apple grew bigger. Maybe my brain kept pumping more testosterone in those years I sang bass. Whatever it was, I can say it was the manliest I had ever been.

Nelz A., member since 2006

Section leaders in place for sopranos, altos, basses

Each year, the choir looks for one person from each section to organize the occasional rehearsal and generally track of things within their section. As volunteer tasks go, it’s comparatively low-key, and as an added bonus it’s a good way to get to know the people you’re singing most closely with!

In our 2010 season Swati and Laura will be continuing as soprano and alto section leaders, and Bob will be taking over the basses. Now all we need is somebody willing to wrangle those tenors…

In other news, pictures from our appearance at the Walk for Life are on their way. Did you sing? How did it go? This is often a new choir member’s first ever concert, and we’d love to hear your stories, whether they are from this year or a past season!!

Defying Rigid Sectionality…

I consider myself a baritone with a wide crazy range. I’m not a true bass, but I can sing quite low without getting a scratchy throat. I’m not exactly a tenor either, but I can sing high tenor notes if I breathe properly (or wear tight pants).

When I joined the choir in 2006, I sang with the tenors, believing that I have the range to hit the high notes. The problem was I had pitch issues.

The following season, I went down to baritone/bass. I found it easier, and had less problems with pitch. This earned the ire of my fellow tenors. They jokingly called me a turncoat and traitor, then said I was bisectional. I found that hilarious.

I sang baritone/bass for the next three or four years, but recently I’ve discovered the joys of singing in my head voice. I was enamoured by Chris Colfer’s version of “Defying Gravity,” and actually attempted to hit that ridiculous high F.

I did.

This season I’m rejoining the tenors. It was challenging getting back to singing the upper registers, but I had to try and learn. Who knows, if I train my voice well enough, I may be able to join the sopranos next season!

by Nelz A, member since 2006